The emotional state are modifiable with proper training so that people can zoom out the thoughts and feelings that lead them to the sadness and anguish, and replace them by others that lead them to welfare. Using magnetic resonance imaging or Positron Emission Tomography techniques, it has been shown that certain types of negative emotions as: anxiety, anger or depression, generate increased brain activity in the right prefrontal cortex, while positive as joy or satisfaction emotions generated more activity in the left prefrontal cortex. It seems that the natural tendency for people is to be more cheerful than sad, because a both genetic and learned predisposition to the activation of those areas of the brain responsible for emotions positive. By using the techniques listed Professor Richard Davidson, director of the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin, found in a Tibetan lama, the part of her brain responsible for happiness showed the busiest ever obtained in a human being. Whereas the Buddhist meditation, as the basis for the change, Davidson coached a group of individuals subjected to stressful situations in the knowledge and practice of Buddhist meditation for three hours per week over two months. The objective was to measure the cerebral impact of this Tibetan practice and discover if the mastermind of the lama who had done the previous discovery, was an exception of nature or the result of your effort and perseverance in meditation. The results unveiled a sensitive displacement towards the feelings of happiness as well as an unexpected strengthening of the immune system of people who had known and applied the techniques of Buddhist meditation. Original author and source of the article..